Rhetorical Devices
Anaphora
repetition of the first part of the sentence through-out piece
A thing that represents or stands for something else
Verbal irony
A question that is asked in order to make a point rather than to elicit an answer
Antithesis
Two opposite ideas are put together in a sentence to achieve a contrasting effect
A word that imitates the sound it represents.
Language that appeals to the senses
an author's attitude towards his/her subject
Alliteration
Repetition of the same letter or sound
an author's attitude towards his/her subject
Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, Tone-- the way a piece of rhetoric is crafted
Placement of two things closely together to emphasize comparisons or contrasts
Hyperbole
exaggeration to express strong emotion, make a point, or evoke humor
Verbal irony
Use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning
the urgency, need, or demand for a piece of rhetoric
Diction
Choice of words, which influence mood, attitude, dialect, and style of writing
A question that is asked in order to make a point rather than to elicit an answer
A thing that represents or stands for something else
A comparison without using like or as
Inference
A conclusion based on evidence and reasoning
A word that imitates the sound it represents.
repetition of the first part of the sentence through-out piece
A nonhuman object being given human qualities; similar to metaphor
Imagery
Language that appeals to the senses
A nonhuman object being given human qualities; similar to metaphor
A thing that represents or stands for something else
brief and indirect reference to a person, place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political significance. It does not describe in detail the person or thing to which it refers
Juxtaposition
Placement of two things closely together to emphasize comparisons or contrasts
Verbal irony
A comparison without using like or as
A word that imitates the sound it represents.
Irony
Use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning
brief and indirect reference to a person, place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political significance. It does not describe in detail the person or thing to which it refers
Placement of two things closely together to emphasize comparisons or contrasts
an appeal to ethics -- credibility of source
Metaphor
A comparison without using like or as
Repetition of the same letter or sound
A word that imitates the sound it represents.
Choice of words, which influence mood, attitude, dialect, and style of writing
Oxymoron
A figure of speech consisting of two apparently contradictory terms
Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, Tone-- the way a piece of rhetoric is crafted
brief and indirect reference to a person, place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political significance. It does not describe in detail the person or thing to which it refers
an appeal to emotions -- evoking an emotional response
Onomatopoeia
A word that imitates the sound it represents.
Repetition of the same letter or sound
A nonhuman object being given human qualities; similar to metaphor
an appeal to emotions -- evoking an emotional response
Personification
A nonhuman object being given human qualities; similar to metaphor
a question asked to emphasize an argument -- no answer is actually necessary
Repetition of the same letter or sound
A play on words
Rhetorical Question
A question that is asked in order to make a point rather than to elicit an answer
Repetition of the same letter or sound
Two opposite ideas are put together in a sentence to achieve a contrasting effect
the art of persuasion
Pun
A play on words
an author's attitude towards his/her subject
an appeal to ethics -- credibility of source
A conclusion based on evidence and reasoning
Simile
Makes a comparison, showing similarities between two different things, using like or as
an appeal to logic -- using facts, statistics to prove argument
A comparison without using like or as
an appeal to ethics -- credibility of source
Sarcasm
Verbal irony
Two opposite ideas are put together in a sentence to achieve a contrasting effect
Language that appeals to the senses
A play on words
ethos
an appeal to ethics -- credibility of source
A thing that represents or stands for something else
an appeal to logic -- using facts, statistics to prove argument
an author's attitude towards his/her subject
pathos
an appeal to emotions -- evoking an emotional response
the art of persuasion
Repetition of the same letter or sound
an appeal to ethics -- credibility of source
Symbol
A thing that represents or stands for something else
Choice of words, which influence mood, attitude, dialect, and style of writing
exaggeration to express strong emotion, make a point, or evoke humor
repetition of the first part of the sentence through-out piece
rhetoric
the art of persuasion
Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, Tone-- the way a piece of rhetoric is crafted
Illustration of interaction between Subject, Audience, Speaker
Repetition of the same letter or sound
logos
an appeal to logic -- using facts, statistics to prove argument
A figure of speech consisting of two apparently contradictory terms
Two opposite ideas are put together in a sentence to achieve a contrasting effect
an appeal to ethics -- credibility of source
tone
an author's attitude towards his/her subject
an appeal to ethics -- credibility of source
the art of persuasion
Use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning
rhetorical question
a question asked to emphasize an argument -- no answer is actually necessary
Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, Tone-- the way a piece of rhetoric is crafted
A conclusion based on evidence and reasoning
Use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning
exigency
the urgency, need, or demand for a piece of rhetoric
the art of persuasion
an appeal to ethics -- credibility of source
A figure of speech consisting of two apparently contradictory terms
allusion
brief and indirect reference to a person, place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political significance. It does not describe in detail the person or thing to which it refers
Placement of two things closely together to emphasize comparisons or contrasts
Choice of words, which influence mood, attitude, dialect, and style of writing
A nonhuman object being given human qualities; similar to metaphor
SOAPSTone
Speaker, Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, Tone-- the way a piece of rhetoric is crafted
the urgency, need, or demand for a piece of rhetoric
Language that appeals to the senses
Choice of words, which influence mood, attitude, dialect, and style of writing
Rhetorical Triangle
Illustration of interaction between Subject, Audience, Speaker
repetition of the first part of the sentence through-out piece
A figure of speech consisting of two apparently contradictory terms
A conclusion based on evidence and reasoning